DIY Pantry Spice Rack

DIY pantry door spice rack

I would like to dedicate this post to my mother, who passed away April 17th, 2016. This one’s for you, Mom. ♥

Once upon a time, I created a super-organized pantry. Then I moved. (Sigh.) But new beginnings bring new opportunities, so here’s my new and improved pantry. After much searching for different ways to organize spices and such,  I tweaked some Pinterest ideas, and here’s what I ended up with.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Let me first say that I had some reservations about this project, not because of the building of the racks, but because of the uncertainty of mounting them on a hollow-core door. If you have the same hesitation, don’t sweat it because mounting the units was easy, and they feel very safe and secure.

This project requires only basic carpentry skills. And if you’re reading this tutorial, you will also benefit from my mistakes, as I’ll also be sharing with you what not to do. You’re welcome.

My projects are usually pretty inexpensive because I use leftovers from previous projects, treasures from garage sales, and special finds from curb shopping. (I pull a ridiculous amount of wood off of curbs.) That being said, this project is no exception and cost me less than $25. A wire-coated rack would cost two to three times that much, and wouldn’t be specific to your needs like one you can make yourself.

First, I gathered up all of my spices and other items that I wanted to store in the racks, so I would know how to space the shelves and how much wood I was going to need.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I found it helpful to draw a simple sketch, although I did change some of the shelf spacing as I got further into this project. (Incidentally, the second set of numbers on my rough sketch don’t add up to the total shelf dimensions, as they were measurements of the spaces not including the wood. My math isn’t that bad.)

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Since I was doing this project without help, and because of my irrational fear of mounting something on a hollow core door, I decided to break this down into two more manageable units rather than one big one. That turned out to be a very good thing.

Since spices are small and lightweight, I used thin pieces of wood to build the top section. I used Pine Mull Casing scraps that I had leftover from another project.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I have no clue what mull casing’s intended purpose is, but I’m pretty sure it wasn’t created for DIY spice racks. It resembles lattice, but is thicker. I strongly suggest not attempting to use lattice for this project because nails need to be driven into the skinny side of the wood, and lattice is too thin.  The mull casing measured 3/8″ thick, and just shy of 2″ wide—just like it said on the sticker in the last photo. Imagine that.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com
  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Most of the spice racks I saw on Pinterest used wooden dowels to hold the spices in place, which is nice because a small dowel won’t cover up too much of a spice container’s label. However, I chose not to use dowels for four reasons. I would have had to use a wider, bulkier piece of wood to construct the frame if I went with dowels, since a dowel eats up shelf depth; because they are a son-of-a-gun to paint; because I didn’t want the stress of trying to drill the mounting holes perfectly even on the side boards and because I had something else on hand that I could use for free.

And my free dowel substitute was…(da, da-da, daaaaa), wood from a clothes-drying rack. Yes siree, ladies and gentlemen. Recycling at its finest. I disassembled the pieces, and spackled over the center holes to make them disappear. The end holes were cut off when I cut the pieces down to fit the units. I know what you’re thinking. But for the record, I’ve used these before on a similar project, and once they’re painted up, they look great. I also liked these because the edges were routed. If you don’t happen to have a broken clothes drying rack lying around, screen molding or another small piece of trim would be another option.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com I used the recycled wood pieces for the bars that hold in the taller spices, and to make a ledge to hold my smaller spices on the shelves without covering their labels.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I bought bead board paneling for the back of the shelves. Not only did it keep the shelving unit square and more secure, but it was what I screwed into to attach it to the door. Plus it looks sweet! Home Depot sells 32″ x 48″ sheets of bead board for $10, and they cut it to size for me. I laid everything out to get an idea of spacing.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

The bead board on my top unit was 18″ wide x 32″ tall, and the bead board for the bottom unit was 18″ wide by 30″ tall. My pantry door measured about 24″ x 7′, which left roughly three inches of space on each side to allow the door to open and shut freely. Very important.

I suggest priming and painting the wood pieces before you cut them. You can paint it in half the time with a lot less mess. I didn’t paint first because I was on a roll and didn’t want to stop, but this is one of those important do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do suggestions.

I cut all my pieces making sure that all of the shelves were exactly the same length, and making sure that the two side pieces were exactly the same length. If the boards are not of equal length, you will not be a happy camper when you assemble them.

For the small spice containers, the space between shelves (not including the shelf itself–air space only) was about 3 3/4″, and for the taller spice containers, the space was 6″. That spacing allowed just enough “headroom” to be able to lift the taller containers up and over the bar that kept them from falling out.

Next I pre-drilled all my nail holes. Simply put, I stink with a hammer. And since there wasn’t much room for error on this thin wood, I needed the nails to go in very straight. Also, the nails were tiny and would bend easily if I didn’t have pre-drilled holes. Bending nails while hammering them is my specialty.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I pre-drilled two holes per shelf on the pieces of wood that formed the sides of the unit, and partially inserted my nails. I knew that assembling this was going to be a balancing act, and I didn’t want to be scrounging for nails while trying to hold the boards, with a hammer clenched between my teeth.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I glued the end of every board I nailed. And yes, I did get this unopened glue for $1 at a garage sale (note sticker). If you are buying wood glue for this project, make sure to get paintable glue.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Then I nailed and nailed…

A smaller upholstery hammer worked best for the small nails.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Then I laid my rack on the bead board to make sure it was square.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I loosely tacked the bead board to the shelf to keep it square while the glue dried, although that probably wasn’t necessary since it was pretty square on its own. ( Can you say OCD?) I tacked it loosely so that after the glue set up, I could remove the bead board, and paint it more easily.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Next, I repeated the same process for the bottom unit, only I used 1 x 4 pine instead of mull casing in order to accommodate larger items.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Next I primed, and then painted using a latex semi-gloss paint from Sherwin Williams in the color “Pure White”. You must prime raw wood before painting it if you want your paint to adhere.

The bead board was already white when I bought it, but I painted it so that when I had paint touch-ups after I mounted it (fingerprints, glue, hammer marks), the whites all matched. And you will have paint touch ups, trust me. I made sure I painted the edges of my bead board since they’ll be visible.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

After the paint dried, I assembled all the wood pieces. I used nails and glue to attach the bead board backing. I also drove a nail through the back of the bead board and into the center of each shelf to prevent the shelves from sagging or warping over time.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Then came the scary installation part. This was especially nerve-racking for me because I had just installed new interior doors. And if that weren’t enough, they were special ordered from Lowe’s, so if I messed up the door, it was going to be awhile before I could get a new door to try again. Pressure. Here are the hollow-door anchors I used. A package of four was under $2 at Home Depot.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Basically, how these work is you hold your item to be hung, up on the door. You drill through your item and into the door where you want your screws to be. Remove the item, install the anchor into the hole you drilled in the door and then put the item back up and screw it on. Boom. Done. But not so fast.

I drilled holes for the mounting screws through the bead board backing where I felt the screws would be hidden behind the spices. I did this without holding the shelf up to the door since I knew it would be difficult for me to hold up the shelf and drill at the same time. Not a great idea.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Unfortunately, I didn’t take into account where the recessed panels on the door were. So when I held the drilled shelf up to the door, re-drilled through the existing holes in the bead board and into the door, the holes ended up in a recessed panel. I will admit a swear word left my lips on that one. So I ended up drilling two more holes in my bead board and my brand new door. (Personal thank you to whoever invented spackle.) Here’s a picture of where you don’t want your holes to end up.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I decided to use three anchors for each shelf unit, but four–one in each corner–would have been better.

Since my door had a handle rather than a knob, I had to be sure to place the bottom unit low enough so that it didn’t interfere with the handle’s operation.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I was still leery of this whole hollow door issue, so I decided it best to install the lower shelf first. A screw-up down low wouldn’t be as noticeable.

I stacked pieces of wood on the floor under the shelf, so I wouldn’t have to try to hold it while I was drilling. I made sure it was at the desired height, centered and level on the door. Next I drilled through my existing holes in my bead board (the second set–ugh) and into the door.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I removed the shelf from the wood stack, and screwed the wall anchors into the holes I had drilled in the door. The creaking noises during the screw turning made me cringe a bit, but I kept plugging away—ever so gently.

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Since hollow core doors these days are sort of cardboardish, I was left with fuzzies around the anchors. My OCD was wanting to give that thing a hair cut, and I openly admit I started to remove it with a utility knife. But I got a grip and quit because that tiny bit of “squish-out” is never going to be seen—ever.

I propped the shelf back up on the piece of wood, lined up the holes in the bead board with the wall anchors (I could actually see the anchors through my drilled holes if I looked closely) and installed the screws.

I repeated the process with the top shelf. Installing the bottom unit first, turned out to be a good idea because I could balance the top unit on it while I leveled and drilled.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Lastly, I painted the screws and touched up the paint as needed.

I had actually stopped using most of my spices after I’d moved because it was such a hassle to find what I needed. You can see why from this “before” photo.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And here are my after photos.

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

  DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

It took me about a day and a half from start to finish for this project. That included figuring out how to space everything, a trip to Home Depot for supplies, painting, assembling and hanging. It was well worth the time, as these storage units have made my life so much easier, and now I have two empty cupboards in my kitchen!

 DIY Pantry Spice Rack/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

If this project seems too complicated for you, and your spice cupboard is a wreck, you may want to check out my simpler “no construction” Dollar Store idea for storing spices by “Clicking Here“.

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and Journeyman Painter. Feel free to visit her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com to view more before and after pictures of her projects. And if you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.

Advertisement

DIY Rolling Pantry Tucks Into Space by Fridge

Rolling Pantry for kitchen

Do you have an empty space in your kitchen next to your refrigerator? If you do, and want to make good use of that space, you might want to add this rolling pantry to your honey-do list.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I wish I could take credit for this idea, but I can’t. I saw it on a Facebook post, and decided to construct one, only with a couple of tweaks to make it work better for my situation. Here’s the original post—http://www.instructables.com/id/Hidden-Fridge-Gap-Slide-Out-Pantry/.

I agonized over measurements for about half a day before deciding to build the pantry one inch smaller than the width of the space. This allowed for a decent amount of wiggle room when wheeling it in and out.

I purchased MDF (medium density fiberboard) from Home Depot, which is my all-time favorite construction material. It’s amazingly smooth, doesn’t splinter or have distracting knots, and it paints beautifully. The only con I’m aware of is that it can’t be exposed to water, so it can only be used on interior projects.

I bought a 3/4″ thick, 4′ x 8′ sheet of MDF, and Home Depot cut it down into seven boards, all at a length of 5’4″ by 6 3/4″. I originally wanted the pieces cut at seven inches, but I went with 6 3/4″ instead so I could get an extra board out of the sheet. I allowed 1/8 inch loss of material for each cut made, as that is the saw blade thickness.

I used two of the 5’4″ pieces for the sides of my unit, and cut the rest of the boards at home for the individual shelves, and the top and bottom pieces. I had a nice sized piece left over for another project too. Hernia alert!! MDF is very heavy. If you plan to purchase a sheet of it to cut at home, be sure to have help carrying it! Here are my cut pieces.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I constructed the rolling pantry as you would construct any bookcase, and used a bead board plywood scrap that I had on hand for the back to keep it square.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I used several garage sale purchases that I had on hand to keep the cost down, including finish nails, the handle, the wheels and some upholstery tacks.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

First I cut my bead board to the size I wanted my unit to be. I then constructed a box with simple butt joints to fit the size of the bead board, being sure to glue all four corner butt joints. The top and bottom pieces should be placed in between the two side pieces, rather than on top and on bottom of the two side pieces. It makes for a more sturdy piece, since gravity would be working with your nails if they’re perpendicular to the floor instead of parallel to the floor. You want your nails working against gravity whenever possible.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I like using upholstery tacks for attaching backing to a shelving unit because the big heads don’t allow the bead board to pull off. If finishing nails are used, the bead board can be pushed off right over the top of them. I used wood glue here too.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Then I decided where I wanted my shelves to be, based on what I anticipated storing on them.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

It’s much easier to paint shelves before installation, so I put a coat of primer and a coat of finish on the shelves, and all the semi-assembled pieces.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

After I installed the shelves, I caulked, spackled and applied the final coat of paint. Caulking the cracks makes for a much more professional-looking job as you can see here.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s when I realized the importance of using the right kind of wheels. I have a bucket of miscellaneous hardware that I pulled this first set of garage sale wheels out of.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I tried wheeling the pantry on these wheels, and as luck (or lack thereof) would have it, they weren’t a good choice. They were made of glass or porcelain, and I’m guessing they used to be on an antique piece of furniture. They would probably have been just fine on linoleum, but they weren’t well-suited for ceramic tile since they wouldn’t grip the tile. And since they were small, they were catching in my grout lines. So back out to my junk bucket I went. I found these larger, rubber wheels, and they worked much better.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Since my garage sale wheels didn’t come with screws, I searched my garage sale screw stash and found the perfect size.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s the finished rolling pantry. Ta-da!!

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Going…

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Going…

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Gone!

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

It tucks quite nicely in my little space.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

This magnificent contraption holds lots of kitchen stuff, and frees up my “real” pantry for my most often used items.

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

DIY Rolling Pantry / HomestagingBloomingtonIL

Toddler alert! Although I love this idea, it wouldn’t be a safe storage solution if you have toddlers who could possibly pull the unit out and tip it over. I placed my handle out of reach, and it would take a pretty strong child to pull this out of its resting place, but best to rule on the side of caution.

I had originally planned to insert wooden dowels a few inches above each shelf to keep items from falling off as was shown in the original post, but I decided it wasn’t necessary.

As far as cost goes, the MDF plywood was $27.00. The rest of the supplies were either garage sale bargains or leftovers from other projects. I got a lot of bang for my buck on this one!

For other kitchen storage ideas, visit my posts, “Creative Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids“, “How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display” and “Organize My Kitchen Pantry With What?!“.

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and Journeyman Painter servicing the Central Illinois area. Feel free to visit her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com to view her portfolio for more before and after pictures of her projects. And if you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.

Organize My Kitchen Pantry With What!?

Know what you can do with a dozen clear dollar-store butter dishes, and five feet of Velcro?

Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I’m guessing if you read my post title you already know the answer is organize your pantry. Allow me to show you how.

First, some pantry background—I live in a tiny space, and am a freak about utilizing every inch of it. Really—every inch. I have a cozy but functional kitchen, and that’s where I need the most help. I’m fortunate enough to have a pantry, and have already added extra shelving where there wasn’t any. If you take a look at the photos, you can see where I added a small shelf above the main shelves because there was so much wasted space. I don’t like seeing airspace. I want something everywhere there’s air.

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I also added one of those fantastic, coated wire racks to the pantry door. It holds a lot of groceries, and I highly recommend trying them if you’re short on cabinet space. Also, if you don’t have a pantry at all, but have an open space next to your fridge, see how you can make a rolling pantry by clicking here.

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

So after I gave myself a big “Atta Girl!” for the added shelf idea and the wire rack addition, I realized I still had too much…well…air. So after living with the extra airspace for four years, I finally made it my mission last week to scour every Dollar Store in Bloomington, Illinois to find something to get rid of it. After only my second Dollar Store—The Dollar Tree to be exact—I found exactly what I was looking for.

You know that feeling you get when you’ve been shopping tirelessly for a new home, and you walk into one and know immediately that it’s the one? That’s the exact feeling I had when I saw my lovely, dollar-a-piece butter dishes. I just knew. I snatched up every single one. A dozen total. I’m sure the cashier was wondering what a person could do with a dozen butter dishes. She was probably also wondering about the condition of my arteries. That’s a lot of butter.

So here’s a picture of the space that has frustrated me for so long. You see it. The space between the shelves and the door jamb. That’s six-inches of prime real estate just begging to be utilized.

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

If you scroll back, and look at my coated rack on my pantry door, you’ll notice the top two compartments are filled with spices. Those spices, paired up with my incredible butter dish lids are about to take care of my problem. Relocating my spices would then free up the racks for other pantry items. Be still my heart.

So learn from my mistakes on this one. I originally was going to drill holes in the butter dishes, and screw them into the wall, but I knew I’d probably end up breaking some of them between the drilling, and screwing them into the wall. I ultimately decided to use Velcro. Gotta love Velcro.

The next picture is what not to buy. I thought the little pre-shaped coin Velcro would be great. Peel those babies, stick ’em on and no more air! Wrong. I put them up, put my spices in them and a few minutes later, I experienced the domino effect as they fell off the wall, each knocking off the one below it. Made me wanna cuss a little bit. Ok. I did cuss a little bit. Then I cussed a lotta bit as I peeled 24 stickers off my wall, and 24 stickers off my gorgeous butter dishes. The Velcro coins aren’t strong enough.

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s a picture of what actually worked. That’s what I’m talkin’ about! Heavy duty, hold-on-to-your-panties Velcro.

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I used about five inches of self-sticking Velcro on the back of each butter dish lid, and mounted equal strips on the wall where I wanted them to hang, and wha-la! Finally, no more air!

Another reason I love the butter dish idea is because they’re see-through. Even so, you’ll notice in my after photos I labeled the spices on both the front of the lids, and on the tops of the lids so they’re still easier to see. Yes, I do alphabetize my spices. And yes, perhaps I have a touch of OCD going on. Check out my before and after photos.

Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

In addition to spices, those little envelopes of taco seasoning, dry soup mix, Kool-aid and such work well in these as do the tin boxes of spices.

Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I know this project isn’t exactly deserving of the Nobel Peace Prize, but I still get a certain amount of satisfaction knowing I’ve done the most that I can with the space I have. Now what can I do with twelve of these…

 Dollar Store Kitchen Pantry Organization / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and Journeyman Painter servicing the Central Illinois area. Feel free to visit her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com to view her portfolio for more before and after pictures of her projects. And if you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room

Welcome to my odd-but-lovable little laundry room. The smallest room in my house used to be the biggest disaster, but not anymore!

Here are photos of how the laundry room looked right before I moved in. It measures a cozy  4′ x 12′. I suppose it’s actually more of a laundry hall than a laundry room, and the washing machine and the dryer sit across the room from each other instead of next to each other. I wasn’t kidding about the odd part.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Here’s the dumping ground my laundry room became shortly after moving in. It went from odd, to odd and messy. This is the first room I see as I enter my house from the garage—not exactly a welcoming greeting at the end of the day.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I needed some small-space ideas, so I turned to Pinterest for advice. Funny thing—when I searched “Small laundry rooms” I ended up with pictures of beautiful laundry retreats with farmhouse sinks, dog washing stations and crystal chandeliers. Clearly my odd little laundry hall was never going to look like that, but I knew it could be better.

My “must have” list included lots of storage, a brighter space, a clothes-drying rack, easy access to my laundry detergent,  a space to sort clothes and a place to hang coats.  But most important, I needed it to be beautiful. That’s a tall order for a tiny space.

I was able to re-use leftover cabinets from my kitchen remodel for this project, but garage sales, Habitat for Humanity Restores and even your local curbs are great places to snag some second-hand cabinets. The only new cabinet I had to buy for this project was a pantry-type cabinet.

I began by drawing sketches on graph paper of different ways to combine the cabinets I had on hand to make them fit into the space. It was basically a large-scale game of Tetris. First, one cabinet was stacked on top of another on the dryer side of the room by my oh-so-wonderful carpenter brother, Mike.

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Another cabinet was added on the lower right. On the upper right, I simply added a face frame to that area for open display since I didn’t have a cabinet to fit that tiny space. Looks a little scary, I know.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

On the washing machine side of the room, the store-bought pantry cabinet went on the left. I made a simple cabinet to go on the top of it for open display. Once the face frame was added to it, it blended right in with the other cabinets. I turned a cabinet sideways to go to on the upper right, and added another cabinet below it.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

If you look closely at this photo, you can see that I added a sheet of floor-to-ceiling beadboard to the side of the pantry cabinet to give the illusion that the pantry cabinet and the cabinet on top of it were one large piece.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I decided to make use of the awkward space between the two cabinets (above photo) by making shelves for that area. I put a small trim piece on the front of each shelf to beef them up a bit, and I added beadboard behind them for a little extra cuteness.

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

It ended up being the perfect spot for my laundry detergent. Like a glove, as they say. Fingers crossed that Tide won’t change the size of their detergent bottles.

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

So that the cabinets would look a little more updated, I added hidden hinges. The previous hinges were shiny silver ones. I could have kept them and spray-painted them white to help them blend in, but chose to go the hidden hinge route since that’s what was on the new pantry cabinet. See how I added the hidden hinges here.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

My bro added some crown, I added some paint, and both sides of the room were looking better.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Now for the other side.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I had achieved both my storage wish and a special place for my laundry detergent, but I still had a ways to go. Next, I added some board and batten wainscoting. See tips here.

Before…
 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And after

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Before

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

After

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I added these gorgeous knobs from Hobby Lobby to hang coats on. Another item off my checklist.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

In addition to painting the cabinets and wainscoting white in order to lighten up the room, I also painted the walls a lighter color, and installed a new light fixture from Lowe’s. What a difference the light fixture made!

I’ve learned that in small, narrow, utilitarian spaces where good lighting is a must, you can’t beat directional lighting. The lights were directed towards the cabinets on each end of the room. Brighter laundry room—check!

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I then installed this DIY drying rack. See how you can make one here.

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

To satisfy my need for a place to sort laundry, I built this table the same height as my dryer. With the dryer and the table combined, I now have a small area to stack clean clothes. I built the table with legs made from old bedposts I found on a curb. Sometimes my curb shopping and hoarding come in handy! See details on construction here.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I added this small, removable shelf for a place to keep my car keys that are now easy to grab on my way out the door. The shelf isn’t screwed to the brackets underneath so that I have quick access to the water shut offs if need be.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

My sister, Dee, who’s an amazing seamstress, made me this adorable hanging bag that has found the perfect home here in my little laundry room. Love, love, love that bird fabric!

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

My last wish was to have a beautiful space, and I believe I managed that too! Here are the before and after photos.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.comg

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And here are some before and afters of the other side of the room.

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Making the Best Use of Space in a Tiny Laundry Room/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Now I actually smile when I come into my house at the end of the day!

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Journeyman Painter and Certified Home Stager/Redesigner. If you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.Wordpress.com.

Kitchen Re-do on a Budget

Small kitchen organization

When my realtor and I walked through the door of my current home for the first time, it became a contender right away. Then we went into the kitchen and…wait…what?! Kitchens are supposed to sell houses, but not this time. The kitchen was very 80’s, and very brown. Floors, cabinets, doors, trim and counter tops—all brown. It was so sad and dreary. I wasn’t too concerned because I knew a gallon of white paint on the cabinets would perk the space right up. But I didn’t realize how inefficient the kitchen actually was until after I moved in.

My kitchen is small. I can handle small. And at this stage of my life, I’m happy to report I actually prefer small. But I can’t handle disorganization and poor use of space. After a handful of projects that I’ll share with you here, I gained a functional, charming little kitchen for not a whole lot of money. Here’s the completed project.

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I wanted to keep as much of the existing kitchen as I could, and since the previous owners had just updated the counter tops, I decided to keep them. I also decided to keep and alter the majority of the lower cabinets.

Plan A was to try to find new white upper cabinets in the same style as my existing lowers, so I would only have to paint the lower kitchen cabinets. I wanted to replace the majority of the uppers in order to upgrade from 30″ cabinets to 42″. I managed to find a kitchen design center that carried cabinets that were a very close match to the existing base cabinets I wanted to keep. Unfortunately, they were only available in stained oak. Plan B—order brand new stained cabinets and paint the whole darn kitchen white.

While waiting for the new cabinets to arrive, I had several projects to tackle, one of which was filling the grain and painting the existing cabinets (See how here.). See what I mean about the dreary brown?

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Things are looking a little brighter!

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

At this point, it just felt good to get the ball rolling.

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Here’s a before photo of the other side of the kitchen.

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Baby steps!

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Another project was to beef up the “wood” peninsula. What a difference this made!
See details here.

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Next to the stove, was a corner cabinet that had a very small door opening, but lots of space inside. I made the opening bigger by replacing the board to the left of the door with a smaller one. Then I made some pull out drawers for storage using the rolling hardware from some of the cabinets I removed, and from some scrap wood I had on hand. Gotta love free. I built a small shelf unit that tucked back inside the cabinet next to the drawers for storing seldom-used items. See that project here.

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Once my cabinets arrived, the fun began! Many of the photos you’re going to see, will be before (old oak), during (new oak), and after (oak painted white).

First, I had the base cabinet next to the fridge swapped out for one with drawers. Drawers instead of doors are a much more efficient way to go. No more digging for pots and pans!

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Here’s a picture of the “new” cabinet before painting.

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

And here’s the same cabinet painted and with hardware installed.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Ditto to the left of the stove—I had a base cabinet installed that had drawers instead of a door—and went from a tiny 12″ cabinet to a less-tiny 15″ cabinet. I don’t understand why a 12″ cabinet was put into a space big enough for a 15″ cabinet, but no matter. Since the old 12″ counter top was then too small for the new 15″ cabinet, I had my awesome carpenter brother, Mike cut down the counter top from the cabinet in the last photo to fit this one. I trimmed out this cabinet the same way I trimmed out the peninsula.

  Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomigtonIL.wordpress.com

Another issue I had with trying to match the new cabinets to the originals was the change in hinges. My existing lower cabinets had visible hinges, and the new upper cabinets had hidden (Euro) hinges. That lead to another project of learning how to install hidden hinges. See how I did that here.

You can see the shiny hinges in the next photo, that I painted white in the second photo. But after my brother showed me the ropes on how to drill the cabinets for hidden hinges, I was able to get rid of the visible ones. After that, there was virtually no way to tell the new cabinets from the old ones. The last photo in this group of three was after the new hinges were installed. I opted for the soft-close hidden hinges, so no more slamming cabinet doors!

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

One of the first things I did to the upper cabinets was to ditch the decorative piece that ran in front of the window between the tops of my two upper cabinets. That opened things up right away. (You can see the piece I’m referring to in the next photo.) Bigger kitchens can handle those pieces, but in my kitchen, it’s just clutter. Be gone!

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

In order to use all the available space in my small kitchen, I decided to swap out the 30″ upper cabinets with 42″ cabinets. I was grateful that I didn’t have dry-walled soffits to contend with. I also ordered cabinets without those pesky stiles in the way. The easiest upper cabinet swap was the free-standing one in the next photo.

I had planned to install these cabinets myself, because I’d hung a few 30″ cabinets in a laundry room in a previous house myself without any trouble. But after seeing how massive a few of these cabinets were, I knew it was something I wouldn’t be able to do on my own. Little brother to the rescue…

Look at the difference between the puny original cabinets on the left and one of the new, taller cabinets on the right in the next photo.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

So here’s the old cabinet.

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Here’s the replacement cabinet before painting.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And here it is painted out.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Next came the tiny cabinet over the fridge. It was replaced with one that was much larger than the old one.

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

On my “to do” list is to build a divider of some sort to go inside this cabinet.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

To the right of the fridge was this funky, mis-matched, cabinet-stacking wonder that I replaced with an open-shelving unit that I built to accommodate my everyday dishes. I made the counter top from wood I found curbside. The original counter top was the one we cut down and sacrificed for the cabinet to the left of the stove. See the open-shelving project here.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Now for the microwave/stove area. This took a lot of thought. This area was horribly inefficient. The cabinet to the right of the microwave had a door with only a 7″ opening. Not many kitchen items can fit into a 7″ opening, and there was a lot of blind storage space inside of that cabinet that I’d deemed unusable. I think this one was the winner for the worst cabinet in the kitchen.

Before…

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And after.

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

The cabinet to the left of the microwave was only a 12″ cabinet and wasn’t much better than that last one, and was also replaced with a 15″ cabinet.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

The cabinet directly over the microwave was a bit of a mystery since there was a large filler strip underneath it that you can see in the photo below. By removing the filler strip and installing a cabinet that reached the ceiling, I gained a lot of extra storage space. This adjustment also raised the microwave a couple of inches which made for a bigger, brighter cooking surface on the stove top.

Here are before and after photos of that area.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I was then left with a 12″ space next to the cabinet to the right of the microwave that I filled with more open shelving. I made some corbels from scratch to support the shelves. The actual shelves were from the same curbside wood I used to make the counter top on the other side of the kitchen. It tied the two areas together nicely. See how I made the corbels and installed the shelving here.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I used the same wide beadboard on the wall behind the corbel open shelving that I used on the back of the open shelving next to the fridge to further tie those two areas together.

Of course you can’t have a kitchen re-do without new hardware. So pretty!

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Another project that helped this kitchen function better was a very DIY-friendly pantry door spice rack. See how to make one for yourself here.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I also added extra shelving inside the pantry so no space was wasted. I painted the shelves a crisp white, and what a difference! I swapped out the door, door casing and baseboard. I also permanently removed the door you see on the far right that leads to the laundry room. The two doors were constantly banging into each other. Note that the original pantry had only four shelves.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I added three additional shelves, but kept them shallow so items in the back are still easy to see and reach. I removed all of the original shelves and spaced them differently. I lowered the top shelf so there would be enough clearance for cereal boxes. The original bottom shelf was so high off the floor, that there was a lot of unused space in that area so I lowered that one as well. The second shelf from the bottom in the photo below, I made to be U-shaped to wrap around the side walls for easy access to my glass canisters.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I like to put the ends of my cabinets to work too. Here, I used one such area for cutting board storage, and love that they’re easily accessible.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonILjpg.wordpress.com

It’s all in the details. We hear it all the time, and I’m a believer. Here are photos of the trim I added to the bottom of the cabinets. And I do these types of projects the old-fashioned way—a hammer, nails and a nail set/punch.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I went with a small crown molding (1.5″) since I swapped out my existing 30″ upper cabinets for 42″ ones. If I had used a larger crown, it would have dropped my cabinets too low, and the space between the counter tops and the bottom of the cabinets would have been too small. I give my brother all the credit here for the crown molding installation. I added a few pieces of crown after he left, and I must say, it wasn’t as easy as he said it was!

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And about that crown…I couldn’t find much information on the internet about the use of crown molding with 42″ cabinets, and I agonized over whether or not to do it. Unless you’ve got something tall that you must display on your counter top, there’s no reason why you can’t have a modest crown with 42″ cabinets. The space between my counter top and the bottom of my cabinets is just shy of 17″ instead of the “standard” 18, and I would do it again in a heartbeat. So if you’re contemplating whether or not to do this, I say go for it!

They do make a 36″ cabinet that allows for larger crown molding, but I wanted all the storage space I could get. And since my kitchen is small, I felt a more modest crown molding was appropriate anyway.

I decided to add some wall-frame wainscoting, some beadboard, a chair rail and a picture rail to the small, adjacent dining area. The trim I had already added to the bottom of the upper cabinets established the chair rail height. I hooked onto it using the same trim, and continued it onto the wall. I also continued the crown from the cabinets across this wall, but added an additional piece underneath the crown to make it a bit more substantial.

I marked out my master plan with painter’s tape so I would have an idea of what it would look like first. See how to install wall frame wainscoting here.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Wainscoting Ideas/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And here are a couple of close ups of the wainscoting/beadboard/picture rail.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I’m hoping to eventually find some wallpaper to put in the area above the picture rail. I painted a subtle stencil in that area for the time being.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

To finish off the dining area, I decided to use a table that I found on a curb several years ago. Yes, ladies and gentleman, someone actually left this amazing table in pieces on a curb and threw a mattress over the top of it! But I found it. Ha! I gave away my store-bought table that I spent good money on, and decided to use my found treasure instead. A little white paint gave it some extra charm.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

I discovered the chairs at a thrift shop, and they begged me like little lost puppies at a shelter to take them home. How could I refuse? I added a nice, thick cushion to them and re-covered them with some gorgeous fabric that my sis, Dee, discovered at Hobby Lobby. Here’s what the chairs looked like when I bought them.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

And here’s a newly covered chair.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Now for some before and after photos.

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/ HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

 Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

Kitchen Re-do On a Budget/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL.wordpress.com

This kitchen re-do was under $2000 (not including appliances and the new kitchen window), and the original cabinets I removed from the kitchen, were painted and used in my laundry room makeover–another post yet to come. So that $2000 actually transformed two rooms in my house.

I looked into getting a whole new kitchen, but I knew I would be just as happy with a more creative, less expensive approach that I could do myself…mostly. Nothing in this kitchen is high end. Nothing is fancy or trendy. It’s just simple, clean and beautiful. I got the bright, white kitchen I love, more storage and much better function on a small budget.

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Journeyman Painter and Certified Home Stager/Redesigner. If you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.Wordpress.com.

DIY Laundry Room Table

DIY Laundry Room Table

As part of my laundry room makeover, I needed to find a creative, functional way to fill an empty space next to my dryer. It was a smallish, awkward space that was too narrow for a pantry-type cabinet, so I decided a small table that I could use when I fold laundry would be the next best thing.

My laundry room is a bit odd because instead of having the washer and dryer side by side like the rest of the civilized world, mine are directly across from each other. So that awkward space that most people have between their washer and dryer, for me, happens to be between my dryer and the wall. Here’s the “dryer side” of my laundry room right before I moved in.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I realized there was a zero chance that I would find a table exactly the size I needed—16″ wide, 31″ deep and 39.5″ tall. Those were peculiar dimensions for a table, but I had a vision. And I knew the only way to get that table out of my head and into my laundry room was to build it myself. Thus my twenty-seven cent table was born.

My goal was to build a table that would fit snugly enough between the dryer and the wall that socks and undies couldn’t go AWOL. I wanted the table to be on wheels so I could slide it out easily if need be, but most of all, I just wanted the darn thing to be cute. Function doesn’t have to be ordinary.

Here are some of the materials I used to make the table. As always, I would like to point out that it pays to pull treasures off of curbs.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Bargain number one…I pulled the bed posts off of a curb a few years ago. They had decorative tape all over them. Some little girl was expressing herself I suppose. I got tired of peeling it off, so you can still see some of the stubborn pieces in the photos.

Bargain number two…the wheels. These were off of a butcher block kitchen cart I found next to a dumpster. I took it home and stripped it down like a car thief strips down cars for parts. You might scoff at that, but I got some pretty handsome wheels to show for it.

The plywood scrap, as well as some 2 x 4’s and other trim that you’ll see in future photos was all leftover from other projects.

Note that a bolt was missing from one of the ends of the bed posts in the last photo. I bought a new bolt and cut off the head with a hack saw to replace the missing one. There’s where my twenty-seven cents came in. It’s the only item I had to buy specifically to build this table. (I bought four bolts, but only ended up using one.)

I was going to begin this project by cutting the knobs off the ends of the bedposts so I would have a flat surface to attach the wheels to. As luck would have it, the knobs actually screwed right off! And the threads on my wheel brackets matched the threads on the metal pieces inside the bed posts so they screwed right in. It doesn’t get much simpler than that!

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Now I have four little knobs for another project!

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

In order to make the table the correct height, and to have something to attach the bed posts/legs to, I added 2 x 4 blocks to the underside of the plywood. I measured where they needed to go and drew lines as a guide as to where to install them.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I’ve had these spiky threaded do-dads in my stash for so long that I don’t remember where I got them. I had no idea what they were used for, or what they were even called, until I looked online for ideas on how to attach legs to tables. They’re called t-nuts, and the threads inside the t-nuts were a perfect match with the threads that were inside the other ends of the bed posts.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

After drilling holes into the wood blocks for the t-nuts, and pounding the them in, I screwed each block into the plywood top.

DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL
 photo IMG_7509.jpg

Next I screwed the legs into the t-nuts.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Unfortunately the legs were a tad wobbly, so I added extra screws to them.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I flipped the table over and added some ripped down ship lap that was leftover from my screened porch. It covered all the ugliness going on underneath the table. (Note the nice shot of the blue zebra tape.)

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL
DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

At this point, I primed the plywood top and the legs, but only after some deep breathing and determination to finally get rid of that last bit of tape!

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

To add a little more detail, I layered some door casing I had leftover from when I trimmed out my doors and windows on top of the ship lap.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Next, I added trim that was leftover from my kitchen remodel to cover the rough plywood edges.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I primed the trim and painted everything with two coats of paint, and my table was complete! Here she is.

DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Now I no longer have an awkward space next to my dryer. I’ve got a place for some pretty flowers to add a little cheer to my laundry room, and I’ve got a spot for clean laundry when I’m folding.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

One of these days, I’ll be posting my complete laundry room redo, so without giving away too much, here are my before and after photos.

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 DIY Laundry Room Table/HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Final thought…I realize you may be thinking, “Does she really think I’m gonna walk down the street and just happen to stumble across four bed posts that I can make a table with?” The answer is probably not (although it did happened to me *grin*). But you could pull legs off of a table purchased at your local Habitat Restore, thrift store, yard sale or yes, even from a free heap on the curb, to make a custom table to fit your space.

Be creative. Use your imagination. There are endless ideas on Pinterest and Google on how to create simple projects like this one to personalize your space and make it function for you. So get going!

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Journeyman Painter and Certified Home Stager/Redesigner. If you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids

Diy Kitchen pot lid storage

Every human on the planet should have a kitchen with designated storage for pot lids. I am not amused by a game of kitchen Jenga every time I need a lid. Unfortunately, the only place for me to store my lids is in a heap on top of my skillets, and it makes me grumpy when I need the pan on the very bottom.

But I’m happy to report that I’m done with all that. I have the world’s tiniest kitchen, as was recently confirmed by the man who delivered my new fridge. You know it’s small when the fridge man says so, but I love my kitchen. Even in my cozy cooking space, I managed to find a couple of clever ways to store lids more efficiently. If I can find room, you certainly can too.

My storage solution started with this old hymnal rack that I purchased many years ago. It had been stored in a closet for quite some time, but I’d always loved it, and just couldn’t bring myself to part with it. If you don’t happen to have a spare hymnal rack lying around, don’t despair–I’ll show you how to make one in this post.

This rack was too long for the end of my cabinet, so I removed the screws and a couple of nails, disassembled it, cut the wood pieces to the correct length and re-assembled it. I love distressed pieces, so I painted it to match my cabinets (See previous post “Yes You Can Paint Your Oak Kitchen Cabinets“), distressed it, added a couple of hooks and installed it on my end cabinet.

That took care of three of my lids and my often-used colander and steamer. I loved the idea so much that I decided to make my own rack, patterned after the original one. I decided I could mount it inside my cabinet door where my pots are stored. Genius.

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Out to the garage I went for scraps. I found these in my stash, so this rack was 100% free for me to make. And even better, I didn’t have to make a trip out in the frigid, God-forsaken, bone chilling tundra of Central Illinois. It’s been a rough winter, folks.

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I started with the side support pieces, marking where I needed to chisel out a spot for my bottom piece that the lids would sit on. It probably wouldn’t be necessary to chisel a groove in the side pieces if you don’t have access to a chisel or a router, but I did it because the original hymnal rack was constructed that way, and I know it offers a little more support. And more importantly, I’ve been anxiously waiting for a project where I can use my new chisels!

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Please allow me to show off my set of chisels that I scored at an estate sale. I’m loving the leather pouch they came in. Most people would want to show off a new house or car. Not me. I wanna show off my pouch full of chisels.

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I cut slits on my pieces with my band saw to make it easier to chisel out the centers.

  Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Now I chisel! (Insert Tim Allen’s gorilla noise here.)

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s a side view of the piece I’m using for the sides. It’s similar in shape to the original, but this design made more sense for the inside of a cupboard door.

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Next, I slid the bottom piece into the side pieces, nailed it in on both ends, and then cut and screwed in the front pieces, making sure the lid handles didn’t interfere with their placement. The bottom piece that the lids will rest on was a scrap piece of lattice.

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

The two front pieces that hold the lids in, were salvaged from one of those accordion-type clothes drying racks that I broke when I ran over it with my car. It was an unfortunate accident, but I saved all the non-pulverized pieces and have used several of them. My kids think I’m a hoarder. I think I’m smart.

 photo IMG_4301.jpg

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I realize this is not very attractive at the moment, but once I fill in gaps and imperfections with spackle, prime, paint, and install, it becomes one stylin’, state of the art, organizational masterpiece.

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I made sure I used screws short enough that I couldn’t pop them through the cabinet door, which would be highly disappointing, and that I was screwing through the thicker frame of the cabinet. I also made sure that the side pieces of the rack weren’t going to interfere with the door closing. I added an “L” bracket under the bottom piece for extra support.

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I bought these screws at a garage sale, and these are the best screws I’ve ever used. Even I don’t have to pre-drill larger pieces of wood using these. I did, however, pre-drill the holes on this project since the wood was so thin and the cabinets are oak, both of which have a tendency to split.

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here are my before and afters. This is a little slice of lid-storage heaven!

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Creating Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I did these projects in an evening, and the most time-consuming part was waiting for the paint to dry. The two racks combined have given me storage for five lids which makes a huge difference in my emotional well-being. I now only have two remaining lids that stack neatly inside my skillets. No more kitchen Jenga at my house!

For other kitchen storage ideas, visit my posts, “How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display” and “Organize My Kitchen Pantry With What?!” and “DIY Rolling Pantry Tucks Into Space by Fridge“.

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and Journeyman Painter servicing the Central Illinois area. Feel free to visit her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com to view her portfolio for more before and after pictures of her projects. And if you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.

Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim

Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I stumbled across this chunky, old frame at a yard sale not long ago, and fell in love with it. It was battered and broken in half at the corners, but I loved its ornateness, and its masculine bulkiness. So very interesting, I thought. And the lady only wanted $2.00 for both halves of the frame. Sold! Now what to do with it. Hmmmm. I stuck it up in my attic with all my other treasures thinking, “Someday this will be perfect for something.”

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

For me, “someday” can be years. Like when I bought some really nice table legs at a garage sale several years ago. Yep…just the legs. I hauled those $5-for-all-four table legs that I had absolutely no use for, from house to house whenever I moved. Three houses worth. Who does that? I just couldn’t part with them. My son, Brandon, was visiting not long ago, and mentioned that he wanted to build a craps table. I must say my beloved table legs made for a pretty incredible craps table. (I missed the boat not blogging that creation.)

Fast forward now to my super-cool frame. I quickly realize it’s not going to take years this time to find a use for my random purchase. I have a very plain wall at the end of my galley kitchen that needs a boost. I’ve been looking at that wall for some time (yawn), trying to figure out some simple, yet interesting project to spruce it up. It’s just a tiny space, but those areas can be the most fun to decorate.

I decide to use my frame as part of a decorative trim combination to top off some bead board wainscoting. I painted my kitchen cabinets awhile back, and added bead board wallpaper to the inserts on the cabinet doors (Refer to post, “Yes, You Can Paint Your Oak Kitchen Cabinets”). So I’m thinking bead board is a logical choice.

This time, instead of using the bead board wallpaper, I’ve decided to use decorative bead board plywood. I decide it would be a better choice from a durability standpoint. I’ve got a refrigerator door and a pantry door that both open up against this wall.

I know that the plywood comes in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets, so I need a piece of my frame to be four feet long to match that. Four feet will be enough to make this project disappear behind my fridge. I’ll need to piece the frame together since I don’t have a run of it that long. I cut both pieces of the frame at 45 degrees where I’m going to butt them together, making sure I get a match in the design. I’ll probably need to use some stain to help camouflage the joint.

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

So next its off to Menards to buy some bead board plywood, and some trim to go on either side of the frame. The gal working at Menards tells me they can’t cut a 4 x 8 plywood sheet down for me so that I can fit it in my car. Hmmm. I’ve had wood cut down at Menards before, but who wants to argue, right?

Home Depot, here I come. A friendly employee at Home Depot happily cuts some plywood for me so that another Home Depot employee and I can man-handle, bend, and smash it into my tiny, little car. I’m wondering how the heck I’m going to get this thing out of my car when I get home. As usual, I manage because where there’s a will, there’s a way. And I was blessed/cursed with an overabundance of will.

I determine the height of my paneling based on a picture I want to hang above it at a specific height. There are “rules” about how tall to make wainscoting, but I’m not concerned about decorating rules this time. Everybody knows what they say rules are meant for anyway.

I’m lucky enough to have a baseboard that has a wide enough top ledge to accommodate the bead board, so it’s not necessary to remove the baseboard. I simply place the plywood on top of it, and then tack up the bead board with some small, white finish nails. I don’t use construction adhesive because if I get tired of it, I want to be able to easily remove it. I sink my nails, and spackle over them. I caulk along where the plywood and baseboard meet.

Now I can set the picture frame board on top of the bead board, and attach it to the wall with finish nails. It works pretty fantastically (is that a word?) because there’s already a groove routed in the frame from where the glass would normally sit, and that groove sits right over the top of the bead board plywood. The two go together like Thelma and Louise says my son, Ross.

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Now I trim out the picture frame wood with some decorative trim so it all looks like one big, happy family. Here’s what I use.

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I place the trim both underneath and on top of the frame piece.

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s a close up of the finished trim.

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I debate on whether or not to paint the wood from the frame white, but I like the old, worn look of it just like it is, and decide to leave well enough alone. So I paint the bead board and both pieces of trim white so they all match. I use some Old English furniture polish on the frame to hide the scratches, and it’s beautiful!
Here’s my little wall all decked out. Total cost was under $30.

Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

And here are before and after photos.

Before
Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

After

 Turn a Vintage Picture Frame Into Decorative Trim / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

It’s sort of amusing that the picture I chose to hang over my project says, “Kitchens are Made for Families to Gather”. I’m thinking any family gathering in this kitchen better not consist of more than two or three people or the jaws of life are going to have to be called in to pry everybody out. But I love my picture all the same. It makes me smile. And so it stays.

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and Journeyman Painter servicing the Central Illinois area. Feel free to visit her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com to view her portfolio for more before and after pictures of her projects. And if you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Don’t you just love those crisp, white kitchens with beautiful open shelving? I’ve been craving that look for my kitchen. And how wonderful to take dishes straight from the dishwasher, and put them in a place of honor. I’m happy to report that after finally saying farewell to the dishes I’ve had since 1980 (yikes!), I bought some simple white ones that I would love to be able to display.

But my kitchen is tiny, and although I love my fresh, white dishes, I can’t designate an entire 42″ cabinet to openly displaying them because I have lots of other not-so-beautiful stuff in with my dishes. You know the stuff I mean. I can’t seem to part with those plastic sippy cups from when my grown children were toddlers. And what about that random assortment of sentimental coffee mugs, and those all-too-ugly rusted metal baking pans stacked like the Leaning Tower of Pisa? Definitely all keepers. So, you see, I can’t just remove the doors from my current cabinets because of my meaningful junk.

But what I can do is make use of a blank corner that I’ve wanted to do something functional with ever since I relocated a cabinet that used to be there.

Today’s the day I build a “mini” version of my dream so I can have that same look, just on a smaller scale. A much smaller scale. I must confess, I’m a painter, not a carpenter. And I’m a girl! If I can do this, you can too. It’s very simple construction, and there’s really nothing to it. And if yours turns out not-so-great, you can use it in the garage for storage or give it to somebody for Christmas–someone you’re not real fond of.

I want my cabinet to be of the same construction as my existing cupboards so that they all look like they were born and raised together. Fortunately, I have paint that matches my other cabinets because I painted them a couple of years ago. (See previous post, “Yes You Can Paint Your Oak Kitchen Cabinets“) Here’s my empty space.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I decide to make my cabinet 1/2” smaller than the wall. Since my wall space is 15″, I decide to make the cabinet 14.5” wide. (As you can see, I’m a whizz at math.) I make it deep enough to hold the bowls and plates I’m itching to display.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

First, I study how my existing cupboard is constructed. I can make it look identical, even though I’m not going to router the grooves for the back piece of the cabinet to slide into. No one will ever know it’s not made the same way. I won’t tell if you won’t.

Here are my materials. The 1 x 2’s are to form a back frame, and to trim out the front of the finished cabinet. The 1 x 8’s are for the sides and the shelves, and a scrap of bead board (not pictured) that I have left over from another project will form the back of the cabinet. I also use finishing nails that I already have on hand.

Note that my 1 x 8’s have knots and other imperfections in them. I buy lesser grades of wood for projects like this, and durabond over the knots and any other dings or imperfections so that it’ll be a nice, smooth finish when I’m done.

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I would like to take this opportunity to show off my new saw horses that my son, Brandon, got me for Christmas. I love my saw horses. Space at my house is limited, so I love that they fold up so tiny and store in a very small space. They’re also adjustable with the flip of a bracket. Thanks, Brandon–I love you even more than my sawhorses!

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonILg

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

So step one is to build a simple frame out of the 1 x 2’s as you can see in the center of the picture. I just used easy, peasy butt joints.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

This frame is what I use to fasten the sides, top and bottom to in order to construct the actual cabinet. I simply hold up the 1 x 8’s against the sides of the frame, and nail them on with finishing nails. I use bar clamps since I’m doing this by myself, but a spouse, neighbor or other human being could hold the boards while you hammer if you promise not to hit their fingers. I also have done this without the bar clamps, so don’t let it discourage you if you don’t own any. I use wood glue so it’ll be a bit more sturdy, and so I can feel like a “real” carpenter. I measure so that the height of this cabinet is exactly the same as the height of my current ones – 42″.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

The 1 x 2 frame is also what the bead board plywood will rest on, and it’s what I drill through in order to attach the cabinet to the wall. Now what I have is this box with no back or front.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Next I measure my bead board plywood, cut it to size and drop it down into the box so that it rests on the 1 x 2 frame. I only loosely tack it in since the shelves will eventually butt up against it to hold it in place.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

The next step is to decide where I want my shelves. I decide to make them permanent, and place them so that they fit the items I want to display. I want wine on the top shelf, and I decide how I want my dishes to stack on the remaining shelves. This cabinet will be located right above my dishwasher, so it’ll be nice to have so close when putting my dishes away.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I use a speed square, running it in both directions to make sure my shelves are exactly level front to back and side to side.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I tack in all the shelves without pounding the nails in all the way to be sure everything’s where it needs to be before I commit. Once everything looks peachy, I pound away. If you’ve read my other posts, you know I’m not gifted in the use of a hammer, so I pre-drill all my holes. (If there were a “Hammering For Dummies” book, I’d buy it.) It’s especially beneficial here to pre-drill, so the shelves don’t jump around while I’m hammering since they need to be perfectly level. Then I counter-sink my nails with a punch.

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Next comes the 1 x 2 frame that sits on the face of the cabinet. This covers up the cracks where the shelves meet the side panels, and just gives the cabinet a more finished look. And more importantly, this is how my other cabinets are made.

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s how it looks now. Front, side and back views. I must admit I surprised myself with the sturdiness of this cabinet. When you have the sides, top, bottom and the shelves all holding it together, it makes for a pretty solid piece of awesomeness. (Looks like someone needs to clean out their garage.)

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Next I caulk all the cracks–every last one. That is, anywhere one board meets another. It looks much more professional when there are no cracks showing. If you don’t have visible cracks, it means all your cuts are precise (or that’s what we want people to believe). Now is also when I skim over the knots, dings and nail holes with durabond. You could use spackle as well. Sorry I got carried away, and didn’t take a picture of the patch job over the knots and dings. You’ll have to use your imagination.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonILg

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s my shelf primed, painted and installed, but not quite finished.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

After living with my new cabinet for a week or so, I decide the side view is pretty boring so I buy trim, cut my 45’s and add some interest. It looks a little less home-made now. Much better!

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Before fabulous trim–

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

After fabulous trim–

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s the bar code from the trim I bought from Menards.

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Here’s my new open cabinet!

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

This project cost me $27. Keep in mind that I already had nails, bead board, caulk, paint and primer. Here are some before and after photos.

Before–

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonILg

After–

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

Before

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

After

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL
How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL
How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

 How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

How to Build a Simple Kitchen Cabinet for Open Display / HomeStagingBloomingtonIL

I love my new cabinet so much! When you have a kitchen with limited storage, adding a cabinet like this one, even though it’s not huge, makes a significant difference. Plus it’s just so darn cute! So of course when my friend, Rachael and I went to garage sales today, I bought a few more dishes–just because I could.

If you’re looking for other ways to add storage to your kitchen, visit my posts, “DIY Rolling Pantry Tucks Into Space by Fridge“, “Creative Kitchen Storage for Pot Lids” and “Organize My Kitchen Pantry With What?!“.

This post was written by Tracy Evans who is a Certified Home Stager, Certified Redesigner and Journeyman Painter servicing the Central Illinois area. Feel free to visit her website at www.HelpAtHomeStaging.com to view her portfolio for more before and after pictures of her projects. And if you enjoy gardening, you may want to visit her gardening blog at MyUrbanGardenOasis.